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A nurse applying a 3M™ Tegaderm™ Silicone Foam Dressing to a patient's arm.

Pressure Injury solutions

Where protection meets prevention.

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Facility-acquired pressure injuries continue to be a growing healthcare problem.Not only can they lead to longer hospital stays and higher rates of readmission, but they can contribute to greater patient pain and suffering – and in some cases, premature mortality.2

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An icon of a silicone foam dressing.

The net cost of hospital-acquired pressure injuries ranges from
$44,000 for a category II PI to $90,000 for a category IV.3

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The anatomy of pressure injury risk

Anatomical sites that overlay a bony prominence, such as the heel and sacrum, account for more than half of all pressure injuries4 because they’re most vulnerable to forces like pressure, friction and shear. Other common locations for pressure injuries are the ischium, ankle, elbow and hip.5
  • A nurse applying a 3M™ Tegaderm™ Silicone Foam Dressing to a patient's sacrum.

    More than 28% of pressure injuries occur on the sacrum.6

  • A nurse applying a 3M™ Tegaderm™ Silicone Foam Dressing to a patient's heel.

    Approximately 23% of pressure injuries occur on the heel.6


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A picture of of the 3M Pressure Injury Prevention Protocol Implementation and Product Selection guide.

Pressure Injury Prevention Protocol Implementation & Product Selection

Download Guide


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Wound care dressings: an important part of pressure injury prevention programs

As part of a comprehensive pressure injury prevention plan, the use of polyurethane foam dressings to protect bony prominences from friction and shear should be considered to help decrease the risk of pressure injury development.4

When selecting a dressing, there are several ideal properties to consider, including the following from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Clinical Practice Guidelines document.4

  • An icon of a dressing on a skin, below moisture bubbles.

    Ability to manage microclimate

    Warm, moist skin is more vulnerable to the damaging effects of pressure and shear, which are recognized risk factors for pressure injury formation.7

    Look for a dressing with properties that reduce the amount of moisture trapped at the skin’s surface.

  • An icon of a hand applying a wound care dressing.

    Ease of application and removal

    Applying and removing dressings from locations such as the heel and sacrum can be challenging, often requiring assistance to properly position the patient.

    Look for a dressing designed to make application easier, which can help lead to fewer dressing failures and fewer unnecessary dressing changes.

  • An icon of a wound care dressing being peeled off.

    Ability to access and assess skin

    Body areas at high risk for pressure injuries should be inspected often to detect early signs of pressure damage.

    Look for a dressing that can be lifted and readhered frequently for assessment without damaging the skin.

  • An icon of a wound care dressing on the heel of a foot.

    Correct dressing size for high-risk locations

    Anatomical sites that overlay a bony prominence, such as the heel and sacrum, account for more than half of all pressure injuries4 due to their vulnerability to pressure, friction and shear.

    Look for a dressing that is specifically designed for these high-risk locations and available in sizes to accommodate a wide range of body types.


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Contact a 3M representative to get more information about pressure injuries

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References
  1. Zaratkiewicz, S., Whitney, J.D., Lowe, J.R., Taylor, S., O’Donnell, F., & Minton-Foltz, P. (2010). Development and Implementation of a Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Incidence Tracking System and Algorithm. Journal for Healthcare Quality, 32(6), 44-51.
  2. Health Research & Educational Trust (2016, January). Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPU) Change Package: 2016 Update. Chicago, IL: Health Research & Educational Trust. Accessed at www.hret-hen.org.
  3. Chan, B., Ieraci, L., Mitsakakis, N., et al. Net costs of hospital-acquired and pre-admission PUs among older people hospitalized in Ontario. Journal of Wound Care. 2013;22(7):341-346.
  4. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance. Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Clinical Practice Guideline. Emily Haesler (Ed.). Cambridge Media: Osborne Park, Western Australia; 2014.
  5. Dassen, T., Tannen, A., Lahmann, N. Pressure ulcer, the scale of the problem. In: Romanelli M (ed). Science and practice of pressure ulcer management. London: Springer-Verlag, 2006. P 1-6.
  6. VanGuilder, C., MacFarlane, G.D., & Meyer, S. (2008). Results of Nine International Pressure Ulcer Prevalence Surveys: 1989 to 2005. Ostomy Wound Management, 54(2).
  7. World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS) Consensus Document. Role of dressings in pressure ulcer prevention. Wounds International, 2016.
  8. Brennan, M.R., Milne, C.T., Agrell-Kann, M., Ekholm, B.P. Clinical Evaluation of a Skin Protectant for the Management of Incontinence Associated Dermatitis: An Open-Label, Nonrandomized, Prospective Study. J of Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nursing. 2017. 44(2):172-180.
  9. 3M data on file. EM-05-01 3924.
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